Opening in 2019

A simple idea to tell the story of the origins of American music has evolved into the National Museum of African American Music (NMAAM).

Be a part of history.

We need your help to reach our goal. Your support is the foundation for the Museum's success in the future.

Opening in 2019

A simple idea to tell the story of the origins of American music has evolved into the National Museum of African American Music (NMAAM).

Be a part of history.

We need your help to reach our goal. Your support is the foundation for the Museum's success in the future.

Opening in 2019

A simple idea to tell the story of the origins of American music has evolved into the National Museum of African American Music (NMAAM).

Be a part of history.

We need your help to reach our goal. Your support is the foundation for the Museum's success in the future.

Countdown to the 2018 My Music Matters: Celebration of Legends

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R&B Legend Stevie Wonder’s Role in Making Martin Luther King Jr. Day a National Holiday

January 10, 2019

Playing a role in the Civil Rights Movement is a thread weaved into the blanket of America’s soundtrack. The legendary Stevie Wonder played an integral part in bringing Dr. ...

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Event

NMAAM: Sips & Stanzas Presents Questioning the Canon

6:30pm, January 17

Sips & Stanzas Presents Questioning the Canon: A Discussion on Interpreting Tennessee’s African American Music History With Beale Street in Memphis, Jefferson Street in Nashville and Vine Street in...

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Rivers of Rhythm

NMAAM announced Rivers of Rhythm®, its first-ever digital exhibition, during this important month-long observance. This first-of-its-kind digital exhibition strategically connects NMAAM to a national conversation that honors the roots of American music.

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Black Music Month image

Black Music Month

Black Music Month began in 1979 when Kenny Gamble, Ed Wright, and Dyana Williams developed the idea to set aside a month dedicated to celebrating the impact of black music. Created by music business insiders, the group successfully lobbied President Jimmy Carter to host a reception on June 7th, 1979 to formally recognize the cultural and financial contributions of black music.

Since 1979, Black Music Month has grown from a small commemoration to national proportions with events held annually across the country.

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